Gender Studies Programme - Events Recap

Events Recap

Manipulating Simone de Beauvoir: A Case Study of the Chinese Translations of the Second Sex

March 25 (Wednesday) 12:30 - 2:00 pm

Topic : Manipulating Simone de Beauvoir: A Case Study of the Chinese Translations of the Second Sex                  
Speaker : Nicki Liu Haiping

Speaker's Biography :
Nicki LIU Haiping is a MPhil student in Translation Department and Gender Studies program of The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Deeply encouraged by Sherry Simon’s and Louise von Flotow’s writing on gender and translation, Nicki combines her passion for gender issues and knowledge of translation studies into her current research project. She attempts to analyze the macro-context (the socio-cultural background of publishers, translators, writers, etc) and the micro-level textual data in order to get a fuller picture of the complex operations and manipulations involved in translation of The Second Sex in China. 

Moderator : Dr. CHO Man Kit, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK

Language : English

Venue : CKB 109 (Room 109, Chen Kou Bun Building) 

Abstract :
Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex, one of the most influential feminist works and the starting point of second-wave feminism, has been translated and published several times in Mainland China and Taiwan since 1972 to date. This thesis seeks to analyze how the Chinese translations of The Second Sex are manipulated by its cultural mediators, especially translators. Drawing upon the Manipulation School’s theoretical frameworks, this paper firstly probes into the praxis of translation activities and Chinese feminist discourses since 1970s through close reading of the paratextual materials of all the Chinese translations of The Second Sex, including translators’ prefaces, publishers’ notes and introductions, etcA few sub-questions are addressed in this endeavor: How did the cross-cultural dynamics of feminist knowledge transfer from the West to China shape the translations of The Second Sex? How did women’s movements in Taiwan before and after the lifting of the Martial Law govern the translation and publishing journey of The Second Sex? How did translators in Mainland China negotiate the volatile mixing of Marxism with Existential Feminism in their translation projects under the Chinese Communist nation-state’s political control over post-Maoist academic feminism? Secondly, through a detailed comparison of  three chapters -- “Sexual Initiation”, “The Married Woman” and  “The Woman in Love” -- among four Chinese translations, this study adopts Jeremy Munday’s Appraisal Theory to bring to light and analyze the complexities of the configuration of gender/sexual identities taken on by translators, the tension between patriarchy and feminism faced by translators in their social context, and the emotional affinities and resistance translators have in their translations — and, ultimately, of how all these factors shape the Chinese translations of The Second Sex at a linguistic level.

poster

Wednesday Gender Seminars

Spring 2023

Co-presented by: Gender Studies Programme and Gender Research Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

2023 Spring Term Poster Page 1 v20230110

2023 Spring Term Poster Page 2 v20230110

More information and registration links for individual seminars will be provided respectively on this website, please check back later. Thank you.

 

18 Jan 2023 (Wed)

Tokophobia as Feminist Resistance? Female Netizens’ Reproductive Experiences and Discourses in China’s Cyberspace

18.01.2023 Poster Page 1

18.01.2023 Poster Page 2

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Zoom 

Speaker: Dr. XIE Kailing (Lecturer, International Development, University of Birmingham)

Dr. ZHOU Yunyun (Associate Professor, Department of Culture Studies and Oriental    Languages, University of Oslo)

Moderator: Prof. LAI Ruby Yuen Shan (Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology & Social Policy, Lingnan University)

Abstract: 

One of the unexpected consequences of China’s One Child Policy is a sharp increase of the number of well-educated women in (Xie, 2021). While globally woman’s educational attainment is negatively correlated to fertility rate, the social norm of heteronormative marriage and child-rearing remains a predominant way of life in China. Concerned about the ‘population crisis’ with its dropping birth rate and fast aging population, the Chinese state has turned to pro-natalist policy that encourage married couple to have more children since 2021, despite the lack of supportive maternity and child-care policies. China’s essentialist gender discourse naturalised motherhood that has leads to the so-called ‘widow-style childrearing’, with little input from the paternal side. How do young women react to such reproductive dilemma, with both fear for missing out and the anxiety of being overwhelmed? How do women gain knowledge, exchange ideas about their reproductive choices and experiences? In what way cyberspace communities provide alternative spaces for female-centred discussions that are often marginalised if not silenced? To investigate in these issues, we have compiled a dataset that consists of 3153 posts under the topic ‘What does reproduction mean to women?’ from Douban, a popular forum among China’s young female urbanites from March 2020 to June 2022.  As an ongoing project, we are currently coding and analysing the dataset with the aim to understand the general themes, topics, values emerged from these discussions. In this talk, we will share our preliminary findings from the ongoing data analysis, but importantly the significance of such alternative public space online for China’s gender dynamics and feminist movements.  

Speaker's Biography: 

Dr Kailing XIE is a lecturer in the International Development Department at the University of Birmingham.  Kailing takes a critical approach to International Development. Her work investigates the underlying social, cultural and political tensions underpinning China’s economic success through the lens of gender. She aims to uncover real people’s lived experience of different development projects against the backdrop of China’s rise on the global stage. Her recent monography, Embodying middle class gender aspirations: perspectives from China’s privileged young women, illuminates the centrality of heterosexual marriage as a primary institution in the organisation and reproduction of labour for the market economy, imbued with gendered inequality. Her article on ‘Premarital Abortion’ was awarded the 2017 Early Career Researcher Prize by the British Association of Chinese Studies.

Dr Yunyun ZHOU is a feminist researcher, a political sociologist, a Chinese Studies scholar, an ethnographic filmmaker, and associate professor based at the University of Oslo, Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages. She positions herself as a fieldwork-based researcher working at the intersection of political sociology, gender studies and cultural studies. Her current research projects cover a range of topics concerning the latest development of Chinese politics and society, such as Chinese women's reproductive choices and discourses, social movements, and media representations. One of her recent publications focuses on the actors and mechanisms behind China's gender lobbying and legislation, which was published in Politics & Gender.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13659304

 

 

Fall 2022

Co-presented by: Gender Studies Programme and Gender Research Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

2022 Overall Wednesday Gender Seminar Fall 2022

More information and registration links for individual seminars will be provided respectively on this website, please check back later. Thank you.

 

16 Nov 2022 (Wed)

The interplay between intimacy and commodification: Exploring family and work lives of lesbians in China

Poster 20221116

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Hui Yeung Shing Building G04, CUHK (In person only. No online link available.)

Speaker: Prof. LO Iris (Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Social Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University)

Moderator: Prof. SONG Jing (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract: 

This study examines the ways in which Chinese lesbians' economic and intimate lives are closely intertwined amid neoliberal development in the urban landscape. Previous research on queer urban life has primarily drawn attention to commodified gay neighbourhoods and other sites for sexual consumption, which are often marketised as part of a liberal and queer-friendly urban landscape, in Euro-American contexts. Such a focus is not adequate, however, to capture the complex interplay between intimacy and commodification in contemporary societies. In this seminar, I will show how the market is experienced by Chinese lesbians as a site of queer agency and vulnerability and map the multiple connections between commodified relations and intimate relations. How do lesbians navigate their economic and intimate lives in a (heterosexual-)family-centred context? How do gender and sexuality intersect with the wider socio-cultural and neoliberal climate in shaping Chinese lesbians' economic and intimate lives?

Speaker's Biography: 

Iris Lo is Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Social Sciences at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. She received her PhD degree in Sociology from the University of Oxford. Her research areas include family, gender, sexuality, reproduction, work-family reconciliation, and social policy. She studies the extent and nature of changes to family and work lives and sociological questions around social inequality. She has published articles in top journals in her field, including Sociology, The British Journal of Sociology, Journal of Sociology, Archives of Sexual Behavior, Fertility and Sterility, and The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy.

9 Nov 2022 (Wed)

Employing domestic workers and gender gap in domestic labor among working parents: An effective strategy?

Poster 20221109

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Hui Yeung Shing Building G04, CUHK (In person only. No online link available.)

Speaker: Prof. CHEUNG Adam (Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Hong Kong Baptist University)

Moderator: Prof. CHOI Susanne Yuk-ping (Professor, Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract: 

This two-stage mixed-method study pulls the literature of domestic outsourcing and intensive parenting together to investigate the role of employing live-in domestic helpers in the time-use patterns of household labor among working parents in Hong Kong. Data from a representative household survey of working parents (N = 791) show that working mothers who hire live-in domestic help spent less time in housework. Yet, the reduction in housework time was partially offset by the managing tasks brought about by the use of live-in help. Working parents, especially mothers, with live-in helpers spent significantly more time on childcare than did working parents without such help. The study also draws on qualitative data from in-depth interviews (N= 20) to unpack the meaning of hiring help and its relationship with the notion and practices of parenting. Our study shows that employing domestic helpers rigidifies instead of closing the gender gap in domestic labor.

Speaker's Biography: 

Adam Cheung is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Hong Kong Baptist University. His research interests include gender ideology, division of household labor, family relations, and domestic violence in Hong Kong and other Asian societies. His research appears in Journal of Marriage and Family, Social Science Research, Current Sociology, Journal of Family Issues, Demographic Research, Population Research and Policy Review, Violence Against Women, and other peer-reviewed journals. He received honorable mention in Early Stage Family Scholar Award from the Research Committee on Family Research (RC06) of the International Sociological Association.

5 Oct 2022 (Wed)

Gender Research Centre Orientation Talk: Honour Based Violence: Minority Women as Agents of Change

20221005 Poster

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Cheng Yu Tung Building 209A, CUHK

Speaker: Dr. BAIG Raees Begum (Lecturer, Department of Social Work, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. CHENG Sea Ling (Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Abstract: 

As a form of gender-based violence, honour-based violence is generally understood as power exertion by close relatives on victims, mostly women and girls, with the belief that they have brought dishonour and shame to the family and community. Mainstream media and political rhetoric in the West have represented Muslim women and girls as passive victims of honour-based violence. This Orientalist framing, often reproduced in transnational feminist discourses, vilifies cultural Others and perpetuates the impulse to “save Brown women”. As a result, young Muslim women have to grapple not only with the patriarchal forces that shape their everyday life, but also the victimizing discourse that circulate in the global arena.This seminar centers young Muslim women as agents of change in relation to honour-based violence. Based on the narratives of non-Chinese Muslim young women in Hong Kong, the discussion will illuminate how they reclaim the discourse on Islam, honour-based violence, and victimhood.This is also the book launch event for the Guidebook on Honour-based Violence - Experiences from Hong Kong, a consortium of cases on honour-based violence in Hong Kong and possible intervention guidelines for frontline professionals. The guidebook is the product of a 2-year project coordinated by Dr. Raees Baig with funding from Equal Opportunities Commission.

Speaker's Biography:

Raees Baig (BSW, PhD HKU) is a lecturer in social work at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She specialises in the study of gender, race and global security in transnational communities. Her published journal articles mainly focus on gender-based violence and women’s empowerment in Muslim communities. Before joining the university, she worked for various local and international organisations, including the United Nations and Amnesty International.In 2018, Raees and her team launched the pioneer project “Muslim Girls and Gender Justice” to explore gender equality issues with non-Chinese communities in Hong Kong. Two books were published under the project, including “Break the Barriers-Inside Stories of Ethnic Minority Muslim Girls in Hong Kong”, and the latest “Guidebook on Honour-based Violence - Experiences from Hong Kong” focuses on imminent situations of honour-based violence in Hong Kong.

 

21 Sept 2022 (Wed)

Daughters’ Dilemmas: Family Strategies of Highly Educated Rural-Urban Education Migrants in Hubei Province, China

 21.09.2022 Wed Seminar

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Prof. SIER Willy (Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Utrecht University)

Moderator: Prof. SUEN Yiu-tung (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract: 

The increased participation of female students from rural backgrounds in China’s higher education system affects the gender dynamics in rural households. In this talk, I will discuss several case studies that illustrate the complex positioning of young women in rural households who become the first person in their family to graduate from university. How do they navigate decisions regarding career and marriage? How can they support their families while building lives they desire without treading on dominant gender ideologies? 

Speaker’s Biography:

Willy Sier is an assistant professor in the anthropology department at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. She lived in China for seven years as a language student and researcher and is interested in questions of mobility and identity. Her PhD-research focused on the role of higher education in the renegotiation of rural-urban relations in China. Her articles based on this project have appeared in Gender, Place and Culture, the European Journal of Development Research, Pacific Affairs, and Modern China (co-authored with M. Driessen).

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13654832

 

14 Sept 2022 (Wed)

The Cultural Politics of Intimacy:  A Methodological Experiment

 14.09.2022 Wed Seminar

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Prof. SUN Wanning (Professor, Media and Communication Studies, University of Technology Sydney)

Moderator: Prof. Susanne Yuk-ping Choi (Professor, Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

It is difficult to conduct ethnographic inquiries into how China’s rural migrant individuals make decisions about their bodies and their sexual capital. We therefore have little knowledge about how inequality impacts on the intimate lives of those who live in poverty and in the socio-economic margins. This presentation seeks to address this problem by examining the contradictions, connections, and coalitions between a range of discursive positions in media, popular culture, and public commentary. In doing some it identifies some useful ways in which cultural texts may be mined for valuable ethnographic insights. 

Speaker’s Biography:

Wanning Sun is a Professor of Media and Communication Studies at University of Technology Sydney. A fellow of Australian Academy of the Humanities since 2016, she is currently a member of the ARC College of Experts (2020-2022). She is best known for her ethnography of rural-to-urban migration in China. Wanning Sun has produced a significant body of research on the cultural politics of inequality in China. Her work includes Maid in China: Media, Morality and the Cultural Politics of Boundaries (2009), Subaltern China: Rural Migrants, Media and Cultural Practices (2014), and her edited volume Love Stories in China: The Politics of Intimacy in the Twenty-First Century (2020). Her monograph Love Troubles: Inequality and Its Intimate Consequences will be published soon by Bloomsbury.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13654820&done=1

 

Spring 2022

Co-presented by: Gender Studies Programme and Gender Research Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Wednesday Gender Seminar Spring 2022 v3

More information and registration links for individual seminars will be provided respectively on this website, please check back later. Thank you. 

 

13 Apr 2022 (Wed)

Mini-Conference of Thesis of MA in Gender Studies 2022
Mini Conference of Thesis poster

 

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Moderator: Prof. SONG, Jing (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Commentator: Prof. WONG, Wang Ivy (MA programme director, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13646280

Please refer to this pdf file for abstracts of the presenting theses

  

6 Apr 2022 (Wed)

The Affective Practices of Love: Collective Body and Gendered Bodies on LIHKG in the 2019 Hong Kong Anti-Extradition Movement

 Poster v20220406

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Ms. WONG, Ka Hei Cecilia (Mphil. Student, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. Katrien JACOBS (Associate Professor, Department of Cultural and Religious Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

This study attempts to complicate the understanding of a heteronormative and subjective protest body on LIHKG in the Extradition Law Amendment Bill (Anti-ELAB) movement by beginning with the analysis on the affective discourse of我哋真係好撚鍾意香港 (We really fucking love Hong Kong). Yet, instead of delving into the question of who is loved and who is not, I ponder: how does a ‘coherent’ subjective protest body is imagined, outlined and fantasied through the affective-discursive practices of love? Under what circumstances, an individual body is loved or not? How do embodied individuals make sense of it? By attending to the discourse 今生只嫁前線巴,今世只娶後勤絲 ([I] will only marry off to frontline brother, [I] will only marry supporting sister), this study shows how the heterosexual love of conservative gender role is fantasised as the movement ideal between the valiant/ men/ effective and the non-violent/ women/ less effective while in which is full of fractures and openings; and teases out the ambiguous and dynamic relation between the imagined protest body and individual bodies through understanding how gendered individuals negotiate with the protest body in their communal and relational affective meaning-making process.

Speaker’s Biography:

WONG Ka Hei is a MPhil student in Gender Studies (home department in Cultural Studies) at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Having digital activist work experiences in environmental campaigning organisations and trained in journalism, her research interests include digital activism, gender and sexuality, affect and emotion, and social justice issues.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13646278

  

30 Mar 2022 (Wed)

Analyzing Female-Victim Intimate Partner Homicide in China via Hierarchical Models and Data Mining Methods

 Poster 20220330

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Ms. GU, Yuxuan Gloria (Mphil. Student, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. ZHONG, Hua Sara (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

One of the more important topics in feminist criminology over recent decades has been the impact of varying levels of gender equality on levels of female-victim intimate partner homicide (FV-IPH). The current state of the literature is equivocal. This study proposes a theoretical account that integrates the traditional ameliorative and backlash theses and offers a possible explanation for some of the inconsistent findings. Specifically, the findings illustrate that: 1) the backlash processes are likely to dominate at lower to higher levels of the instrumental dimensions of gender equality; 2) the relationship between the cultural dimension of gender equality and levels of FV-IPH conforms to an inverted U, such that a backlash effect operates in the short-term but is followed by an ameliorative effect in the longer term. Moreover, due to the constraints of homicide data, historically, FV-IPH research in China is relatively scarce. By leveraging detailed information on 11310 homicide cases (using an innovative source of big data--sentencing documents retrieved from the "China Judgements Online" website), this study is a pioneering one that analyzing FV-IPH in mainland China, and presents researchers with an effective method of utilizing text-mining techniques and hierarchical models which explore the integration of structural gender equality and incidental level characteristics.

Speaker’s Biography:

GU Yuxuan Gloria is a year-2 MPhil student in Gender Studies Programme and the Department of Sociology at CUHK. Her research interests include gender-specific violence, crime and deviance, and computational social science. Her MPhil project aims to analyze female-victim intimate partner homicide in mainland China using big data and text-mining techniques.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13646273  

 

 

23 Mar 2022 (Wed)

Gendered Market Activities among Female Entrepreneurs in China: Case Study from Two Inland Provinces

 

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Ms. LI, Lulu (Ph.D. Candidate, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. SONG, Jing (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

In the past decades, China's market reforms have given rise to private business sectors as well as female entrepreneurship, but coastal and metropolitan areas are often regarded as having greater entrepreneurial opportunities than their inland counterparts. This study focuses on small inland cities, the commonly assumed lagging areas in China's entrepreneurial dynamics, and examines how women in these areas pursue entrepreneurial aspirations and deal with gendered obstacles. This study draws on 41 in-depth interviews with female entrepreneurs in Henan and Guangxi, and examines the gendered process of doing business. Based on how they are motivated and carry out market activities, the interviewees are categorized into four types: 1) Women who were “aspiring” to embrace market opportunities in small cities despite the lack of local resources. 2) Women who allowed their self-realization to be shaped by family concerns and embraced a “serendipitous” entrepreneurship journey without readily available local resources. 3) Women who were “confident” due to their access to local resources as well as their entrepreneurial ambitions. 4) Women who relied on local resources to try out self-employed opportunities. The findings illustrate how women pursue self-realization by discovering market opportunities and mobilizing local resources in different ways. The findings add to previous studies on professional and business women in more developed areas by shifting the focus to the generally more conservative social environment in inland cities, where women negotiate their unique forms of entrepreneurship under competing ideologies and values.

Speaker’s Biography:

Li Lulu is a PhD candidate in Gender Studies Programme and Sociology at CUHK. Miss Li’s research interests locate in gender, work and family in mainland China, especially the inland areas of China. Her PhD thesis focuses on the gendered work of female entrepreneurs in two inland provinces of China.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13646271

 

 

16 Mar 2022 (Wed)

Being Insurance Agents in Hong Kong: Career Choices and Social Mobility among Female Mainland Graduates

Becoming Insurance Agents in Hong Kong Career Choice and Social Mobility among Highly Educated Women from Mainland China

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Ms. ZHOU, Siyuan (Ph.D. Candidate, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. SONG, Jing (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

Insurance has been regarded as a highly professional yet service-based occupation in Hong Kong, which has attracted an increasing number of highly educated women who moved from mainland China to Hong Kong based on their cross-border human capital and social capital. Different from female migrant workers who usually take up low-end work in service and caregiving sectors, these highly educated women face new gendered opportunities and obstacles in Hong Kong’s expanding insurance business in the mainland market. This study focuses on female insurance agents who moved from mainland China to Hong Kong and worked under the Immigration Arrangements for Non-local Graduates (IANG). Based on ethnographic observations and in-depth interviews with 32 female insurance agents, this study examines how these women were recruited into the insurance industry, why they made this career choice, and how their work was carried out with mixed feminine and professional characteristics. The findings suggest that despite the seemingly gender-neutral process of recruitment, women tend to be selected into the insurance industry for their assumed feminine characteristics such as empathy and patience, and they may also opt into this workplace due to the evolving gendered social expectations of women’s work and life. These highly educated women struggled to mobilize their cross-border cultural and social capital to develop their professional career, which is meanwhile constrained by their doubly precarious status as female migrants. Their work experiences point to women’s ambiguous position as professional, skilled migrants involved in feminized service work.

Speaker’s Biography:

Ms. ZHOU Siyuan is a Ph.D. candidate in Gender Studies Programme and the Department of Sociology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include gender and work, migration, and female entrepreneurship. Her doctoral project is about “doing gender” and “doing business” between Hong Kong and mainland China among female IANG insurance agents. 

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13646269

 

 

9 Mar 2022 (Wed)

Single-Sex Schooling and Students’ Interpersonal Development

Single sex schooling and students interpersonal development

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Ms. SHI, Yun Sylvia (Ph.D. Candidate, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. WONG, Wang Ivy (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

Gender segregation increases gender-typed behaviors and affects mixed-gender interactions. Single-sex schooling, as one of the most prevalent institutionalized forms of gender segregation, may have important impacts on students’ psychosocial development. While there is heated debate about how single-sex schooling affects the development of gender cognitions and interpersonal relationships, prior studies have largely neglected these outcomes and were usually uncontrolled. This seminar will present recent research findings and new data on gender salience and mixed-gender peer relations of students from single-sex versus coeducational schools. Such findings have important implications because high gender salience leads to gender-stereotyping and more negative views towards other-gender peers, and good relationships with peers of different genders are pertinent for thriving in a mixed-gender world. It is argued that not only the academic performance but also the gender cognition and interpersonal outcomes should be considered in the evaluations of single-sex and coeducational schooling.

Speaker’s Biography:

Ms. SHI Yun Sylvia is a Ph.D. candidate in Gender Studies Programme and the Department of Psychology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She studies gender from the perspective of developmental and social psychology. Her research interests include gender socialization, gender segregation and stereotyping, and gender variance. Her Ph.D. research project is about single-sex schooling and students’ gender cognition and social development.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13646261

 

 

16 Feb 2022 (Wed)

Politics of Dating Apps

16 Feb Poster Draft

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Prof. CHAN, Lik Sam (Assistant Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. WONG, Wang Ivy (Associate Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

Momo, Blued, and Rela. These are some of the most popular mobile dating apps in China today. In this talk, Lik Sam Chan argues that dating apps are not merely a platform for seeking romance or hooking up, but also, and more importantly, an arena where gender and queer politics manifest anew.

Drawing from an interdisciplinary body of literature on gender, queer, and technology studies, Chan foregrounds the interpretations of dating app users and examines how dating app users make use of the affordances of the technologies specific to their social position. He proposes “networked sexual publics” as a unifying concept to capture the dynamics of the emerging dating app culture and suggests ways for scholars and students to further investigate this global phenomenon.

 Speaker’s Biography:

Lik Sam Chan is an assistant professor and the coordinator of the global communication undergraduate program at the School of Journalism and Communication, the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research takes an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and mixed-methods approach to examine the intricate relationship between digital media, gender, and culture.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13644897

 

19 Jan 2022 (Wed)

Queering Chinese Kinship: Queer Public Culture in Globalizing China

Queering Chinese Kinship Queer Public Culture in Globalizing China

Time:12:30 - 14:00

Venue: Online via Zoom (Zoom link will be provided after registration.)

Speaker: Prof. SONG, Lin (Assistant Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Jinan University)

Moderator: Prof. SUEN, Yiu-tung (Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

This talk discusses Lin Song’s new book Queering Chinese Kinship: Queer Public Culture in Globalizing China (Hong Kong University Press 2021). The book demonstrates that the interactions between queerness and Chinese kinship not only animate transnationally influenced yet locally rooted queer cultures, but also critically shape contemporary Chinese cinematic, popular, and public culture more broadly. Contending that kinship relations must be understood as central to, rather than separate from, any articulation of queer selfhood and culture in China, the book challenges Euro-American centric queer culture’s frequent assumption of the separation of queerness from the blood family, and argues for an alternative approach of “queering Chinese kinship” to underline the vitality and complexity of queerness within Chinese kinship institutions.

Speaker’s Biography:

Lin Song is an Assistant Professor in communication at Jinan University, Guangzhou, China. He holds a PhD in gender studies from The Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is the author of Queering Chinese Kinship: Queer Public Culture in Globalizing China (Hong Kong University Press 2021). His other works can be found in journals including Feminist Media Studies, Asian Studies Review, Convergence, and Continuum, and edited books Contesting Chineseness (Springer 2021), Queering Paradigms VII (Peter Lang 2018), and The Cosmopolitan Dream (Hong Kong University Press 2018).

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13644401

 

 

 

Fall 2021

Co-presented by: Gender Studies Programme and Gender Research Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Seminar list Term 1 updated

More information and registration links for individual seminars will be provided respectively on this website, please check back later. Thank you. 

 

24 Nov 2021 (Wed)

Combatting Image Based Abuse in Hong Kong

Wed gender seminar 24 Nov 2021

Time:12:45 - 14:15

Venue: Esther Lee Building LT4, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Speaker: Prof.Thomas Crofts (Professor, School of Law and Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences, City University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. Yiu-tung Suen (Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK)

Abstract:

Digital technologies have revolutionised the creation, discovery, gathering and sharing of information. Unfortunately, it has also enabled new forms of abusive behaviours which can violate a person’s sexual dignity and autonomy. These include using a device to view without consent a person’s private parts or a person engaging in a private act (voyeurism), or record images of a person’s private parts (‘upskirting’, ‘downblousing’), or to disseminate or threaten to disseminate intimate images (‘revenge pornography’). This seminar will examine how such behaviours have been dealt with in the criminal justice system in Hong Kong and how they should be dealt with. Drawing on recent reforms in other jurisdictions and general theories of criminalisation, the seminar will also examine the proposed new offences against such behaviour in the Crimes (Amendment) Bill 2021.

Speaker’s Biography:

Professor Crofts holds a joint appointment in the School of Law and the Department of Social and Behavioural Studies at City University. He is former Director of the Sydney Institute of Criminology at the University of Sydney. His research in criminal law, criminology and criminal justice centres on criminalisation and criminal responsibility with a particular focus on the criminalisation and criminal responsibility of children, comparative criminal law, criminal law reform and sexuality and the law.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13639563

 

10 Nov 2021 (Wed)

Understanding gender difference in perceptions toward transit services across space and time: A social media mining approach                                                                                 

Time: 12:30 - 14:15 241dd057 5425 86d5 7c98 5bc1070a1155

Venue: Online via Zoom

Speaker: Prof. Sylvia He. Associate Professor and Ms. Shuli Luo, PHD Candidate, 

Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Moderator: Prof Ivy Wong, Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

Location-based social media data can offer useful insights on the spatial and temporal dynamics of public attitudes. In this study, we aim to investigate the gendered attitudes toward transit services in China, utilizing the case of Shenzhen. We collected 44,257 Weibo microblogs, a major source of social media data in China, and applied a series of text mining and visualization techniques to examine the gender differences among our focused themes. The microblogs reveal a distinct gender gap in terms of quantity, as nearly 74% are posted by women. While women tend to be more concerned about the comfort of transit environment (e.g., temperature, crowdedness, and safety, especially at night), men tend to be more interested in transit systems’ e-payment services and reporting traffic incidents. Overall, this study presents an innovative methodology framework for researchers and practitioners to gather customer service feedback and build more inclusive service systems.

Speaker’s Biography: 

Sylvia He is associate professor in the Department of Geography and Resource Management at CUHK. Her research interests include transport planning and policy, urban and regional studies, spatial analysis/GIS, and urban analytics. She is Associate Editor of Travel Behaviour and Society (Elsevier, SSCI) and Asian Transport Studies (Elsevier). She is Honorary Secretary and Board Member of the Hong Kong Society for Transportation Studies, Board Member of the International Association for China Planning, and Fellow of the Regional Studies Association. She obtained her PhD in Policy, Planning and Development from the School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California.

Shuli Luo is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include GIS, transport geography, urban analytics, spatial big data, and social media data. Her works have been published in several leading journals in geography, planning and transport such as Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, Transport Policy, Journal of Transport Geography, and Population, Space and Place.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13640068
(Zoom link will be provided to registered participants)

 

27 Oct 2021 (Wed)

Gender Shock and Gender Compromise: The Effects of Gender on the Lives of Elite Asian Women Scientists

Poster 20211027

Time:12:30 - 14:15

Venue: Online via Zoom

Speaker: Prof. Anju Mary Paul, Associate Professor, Sociology and Public Policy, Yale-NUS College

Moderator: Prof. Susanne Yuk-ping Choi, Professor, Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

This talk draws on in-depth interviews with 40 Asian women scientists to examine the relative impact of their gender on their scientific training and careers in Asia and the West. The original concept of “gender shock” is used to describe the negative or positive experience of these women when they enter a social space or milieu that has a set of gender norms and values different from the one that they came from and are familiar with. I highlight how Asian women scientists are more likely to experience gender shocks at particular inflection points in their intersecting career and life courses, and how they react to negative gender shocks and ongoing gendered social pressures by making “gender compromises” in one or more domains of their lives. These corrective actions often (but not always) damaged or dampened their career trajectories, or took their life course in an unexpected direction.

Speaker’s Biography:

Anju Mary Paul is an international migration scholar with a research focus on emergent migrations to, from, and within Asia. Her award-winning first book – Multinational Maids: Stepwise Migration in a Global Labor Market (Cambridge University Press 2017) – explored the stepwise international labour migrations of Filipino and Indonesian domestic workers. Her forthcoming book, Asian Scientists on the Move: Changing Science in a Changing Asia (Cambridge University Press 2021) explores the increasing return migrations of Western-trained Asian scientists, the factors behind these returns, and how they are shifting the topography of the global scientific field.

Language: English

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13640064
(Zoom link will be provided to registered participants)

  

20 Oct 2021 (Wed)

Gender Research Centre Orientation Talk: How Does The Political Right Make Gender 'Irrelevant'?

Poster 20211020

Time:12:30 - 14:15

Venue: Esther Lee Building LT4, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Speaker: Prof. Susanne Yuk-ping Choi (Professor, Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Moderator: Prof. Yiu-tung Suen (Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract:

Right-wing groups have generally been considered gender-conservative or, in some instances, sexist. Given this background, it is a puzzle why young people, particularly women with relatively liberal gender attitudes, support these groups. This paper tries to answer this question by developing the concept of ‘gender irrelevance’, defined as the processes and strategies through which members of these groups render male dominance and gender segregation within their organizations trivial; sexist behaviours of some group members tolerable; and concerns about gender inequalities unimportant, secondary, and ultimately irrelevant in their decisions to support these groups. The paper further illustrates the strategies of ‘gender irrelevance’, which include the misrepresentation, naturalization, individualization, and universalisation of gender inequality and biases; the construction and deployment of the twin discourses of female privilege and male disadvantage; the tendency to compartmentalize gender biases; the argument of compromising gender; and criticism against an allegedly exaggerated, inconsistent, and double-standard feminism. We believe that the concept of ‘gender irrelevance’ has the potential to help us understand the global rise of the Right and anti-feminism political currents.

Speaker’s Biography:

Susanne YP Choi is Professor at the Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, and co-Director of the Gender Research Centre. Her lead-authored book Masculine Compromise: Migration, Family and Gender in China won the International Sociological Association’s Sociology of Migration 2018 Best Book Award. Her other works were published in top international journals such as American Journal of Sociology, Journal of Marriage and Family, and British Journal of Sociology. Susanne serves as an editorial board member of Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, and a member of the International Advisory Board of Asian Population Studies, and an international advisory board member of Bristol University Press’ Gender and Sociology Series.

Language: English (Presentation)+English/Cantonese/Mandarin (Q&A and discussion)

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13640235

 

6 Oct 2021 (Wed)

Situations and health needs of men who have sex with men who are “pre-exposure prophylaxis tourists”

20211006 Wed Seminar

Time:12:30 - 14:15

Venue: Esther Lee Building LT4, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
(Participants are welcome to attend in person or via Zoom)

Speaker: Prof. Johnson Wang ( Assistant Professor, Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, CUHK)

Moderator: Prof. Yiu-tung Suen (Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK)

Abstract:

A growing number of local men who have sex with men (MSM) are obtaining pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) from other countries/regions and using it in Hong Kong, they are referred as “PrEP tourists”. We conducted a 3-month longitudinal study to understand situations of 110 local PrEP tourists obtaining PrEP from Bangkok. This presentation will talk about the issues (e.g., high prevalence of sexual risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infections, not taking up the required HIV and renal function testing regularly, combine PrEP with other medication that may affect their safety) and health needs of this group.

Speaker’s Biography:

Prof. Johnson Wang obtained his Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health from JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is working as Assistant Professor in JC School of Public Health and Primary Care. Prof. Wang received the Early Career Award by the International Society of Behavioral Medicine in 2016. He is the Associate Director of the Community Research Program on AIDS. His research interests include inter-disciplinary behavioral health and mental health research.

Language: English (for presentation) + English/Cantonese/Mandarin (for QA and discussion)

Registration: https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13638777
(Zoom link will be provided to registered participants)


Past Wednesday Gender Seminar 

2021

Term Theme Date Title Speaker Moderator Language More Information
Spring / 20/1/2021  

A "Phoenix" Rising from the Ashes: China's Tongqi, Marriage Fraud, and  Resistance

Prof. Eileen Yuk-Ha TSANG, Assistant Professor, Department of Social and Behavioural Science, CityU Prof. Susanne Yuk-Ping CHOI, Professor, Department of Sociology; Co-Director, Gender Reseaerch Centre, CUHK English Poster
Spring / 3/3/2021 The Profile of Risk in Cervical Cancer Prevention in Southwest China Ms. WU Yuehan, candidate of PhD in Gender Studies (subject discipline: Anthropology), The Chinese University of Hong Kong Prof. HUANG Hsuan-Ying, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, CUHK English Poster
Spring / 17/3/2021 Family Matters: Gender and Motivations in Women's Online Entrepreneurship Ms. TANG Lin, PhD Candidate in Gender Studies Programme & Department of Sociology, CUHK Prof. SONG Jing, Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK English Poster
Spring / 24/3/2021

蕭紅女性書寫研究The Research of Xiao Hong’s Female Writing

Ms. PENG Yiyi, PhD Candidate, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK Prof. HOYAN Hang Fung Carole, Associate Professor, Department of Chinese Language and Literature, CUHK Mandarin Poster

 

2020

Term Theme Date Title Speaker Moderator Language More Information
Spring / 19/2/2020

Queering the Legitimacy of Motherhood: Cross-Border Reproductive Travel and Lesbian Family Building in Contemporary China

ZHONG Xinle, Mphil. in Gender Studies Programme (Anthropology), The Chinese University of Hong Kong Prof. CHENG Sealing, Associate Professor in Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong English Poster
Spring  / 26/2/2020 Desire for Sale: Live-streaming and DIY Pornography among Chinese Gay Micro-celebrities  Dr. Lin Song, Postdoctoral Fellow in Communication, University of Macau Prof. Jing Song, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong English Poster
Spring 4/3/2020 耽美真人CP與自我規訓式審查  WANG Yiming, Mphil. in Gender Studies Programme (Cultural Studies), The Chinese University of Hong Kong Prof. TAN Jia, Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Putonghua Poster
Spring /  11/3/2020 Women, Heroines, and Women's Sphere: Tianyi and Late Qing Feminist Discourse SHENG Zhifan, Mphil. in Gender Studies Programme (Chinese Language & Literature), The Chinese University of Hong Kong Prof. WONG Nim Yan, Assistant Professor in Department of Chinese Language & Literature, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Putonghua Poster
Fall / 23/9/2020 'To Shine' or 'To Die'?: 'Womenomics' and Women's Worth to the Economy in Neoliberal Japan Prof. HO Swee Lin, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore Prof. SONG Jing, Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK English Poster
Fall / 14/10/2020 Email Order Brides under China's Global Rise Prof. LIU Monica, Assistant Professor, Department of Justice and Society Studies, University of St. Thomas Prof. HAN Ling, Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong English Poster
Fall / 21/10/2020 Premanital Abortion: Reproductive Politics in Post-Socialist China Prof. LAI Yuen Shan Ruby, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Social Policy, Lingnan University Prof. LING Minhua, Associate Professor and Associate Director, Centre for China Studies, CUHK English Poster
Fall / 28/10/2020 Envisioning the City: Arts-based Reseach with Domestic Workers, Asylum-Seekers and Ethnic Minorities Speaker 1: Prof. Julie HAM, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Hong Kong University

Speaker 2: Ms. Merina SUNUWAR, Research Assistant, Department of Sociology, Hong Kong University

Moderator: Prof. WONG Wang Ivy, Assistant Professor, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK English Poster
Fall / 11/11/2020 Marriage as Filial Duty, Personal Choice or Social Expectation?: Exploring Differences in the Experiences o Single Women in Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Tokyo Prof. Lynne Y. Nakano, Professor, Department of Japanese Studies, CUHK PROF. DAI Haijing, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, CUHK English Poster
Fall / 18/11/2020 "Little Bees Just Have to Keep Moving": Temporary Work. Gendered Skills. and Excessive Mobility in Real Estate Sales Promotion in Urban China Prof. Yang Zhan, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University Dr. Joseph Man Kit CHO, Lecturer, Gender Studies Programme, CUHK English Poster

Read more: Wednesday Gender Seminars